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Why don't we have this over here??? Judging from your posts, I thought we did - it's at your place and you have REAL wild pigs! :D

I'm just waiting for an invitation to the SkyPup Cafe.
 

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OK, now I'm nauseous... We as Americans should be ashamed... It's a Bass pro shop, Gander Mountain, Cabela's, Plus+++, all together on steroids. Damn! :shock: An indoor Skeet range???? Ahhhhh! :shock:
 

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That would be amazing. Just think of the wait to shoot at one of those places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is so amazing (and screwed up) is that twice as many people in this country shoot than play golf and yet we have all these mega first class golfcourses all over the country with mega television coverage of them and virtually zilch coverage of shooting sports?
 

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That is probably the coolest thing I have ever seen... Sure saw alot of Tikka/Sako rifles in that, makes me feel not so lonely... haha
 

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1stGenerationAmerican said:
Why don't we have this over here???
I would imagine because hunting over there is bat-shit crazy expensive.

I have never seen the cost of what the actual license is but, before you can get the license:

1. Take a test, preceded by a mandatory training course, to qualify you for the hunting license. Here is one American's experience and the level of difficulty and time the test is- http://www.germanhunt.com/?p=4. The article does not say how much he paid for his testing but note that it took EIGHT months to do the mandatory course in lieu of the faster ones that cost €1500-5000 ($1840-$6134). The test consists of a written portion, a practical portion, and an oral examination and all auf Deutsch. After you pass this course that qualifies you to get a hunting license; the license lasts a maximum of three years. No telling what renewals or what refresher courses are (or cost) required to renew. Also, remember this guy took this course because it was cheap so imagine trying to take one as a foreigner who does not live there (and can't vacation in Germany for almost a year) nor speak the language well enough to pass an oral exam that might cover the anatomy of game animals, their diseases, ballistics and proper hygiene (you'll pay a premium to get the course in English).

2. You need a gun and hunting license issued by the police. It is basically a license saying that the police will allow you to possess a gun for the purposes of hunting (it is separate from the actual hunting license which allows you to pull the trigger on an animal). No telling how much this will cost you.

3. If, as a German, the cost or length of the course and completion certificate were not enough to make you forget about the shooting sports and take up the cheaper sport of golf, then you would be faced with the hoops you would have to go through (and Euros you would have to throw at the bureaucracy) to get a gun purchaser's permit.

I wish we did have something like this here. But Germany is small geographically so it is possible to travel in a day to a place like this. Out of 85 million people, Germany only has 350K licensed hunters; .4% of the total population in Germany compared to, as of 2006, 12.5 million or 4% of the US. In the US, it would be hard to pick a place to open one of these and have to compete price-wise and bring in enough people with the competing ranges here that consist of a guy on his land with a bullhorn, a bunch of wooden frames, and fold out chairs behind some benches, and a port-a-potty. I am interested to know what a membership at this range costs or what a one day session costs. I am willing to bet that it is more like the country clubs here than the Cabela's, Gander Mountains, Bass Pro Shops, etc.
 

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And when you finally DO get to go hunting in Germany, it's under the direct supervision of Der Jaegermeister (It's not just a drink!), who leads your hunt and tells you what animal to shoot. It's a very sterile experience, to say the least.
 

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Someone also suggested that in Europe firearms ownership is highly regulated and that the firearms in the video more than likely never leave the facility.
Something to consider...
 
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