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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
recently bought sig556006 and have this nikon scope on the way.

http://www.nikonhunting.com/riflescopes ... oplex.html

i was in military, did couple yrs of rotc and have a understanding how scopes work and how to zero, but have never used a scope where i could change the elevation on the scope. im not a shooting allstar by any stretch or even an amateur.

Nikon comes with:
Rapid Action Turret Technology
This incredible new system, based on a .223/5.56mm 55-grain polymer tipped bullet, simply and effectively allows you to dial in your elevation anywhere from 100 to 600 yards away in less than one revolution! Now you can stay in the middle of your Nikoplex crosshair at virtually any shooting distance with a quick turn of the turret.

Has anybody shot with this scope or something similar with elevation control?

my questions:

if i have perfect zero at 100 yds w/ 55 grain, and i change elevation to 4, then the goal is that i would be zero'd at 400 yrds with 55 grain. what if im shooting a 75 grain round on my 100 yrd 55 grain zero? (id like to get out to 600 yrds at local range, doubting 55 grain will be consistant enough out at 600) So, with a 55 grain zero, 75 grain 600 yrd shot, would i still set the elevation to 600?

Should a sig556 w/ this nikon scope be able to consistently put a 55 grain round on a 600 yrd target in the hands of a good shooter?

would it be better to re-zero 100 yrs w/ 75 grain rounds? I'm thinking it would be the same zero for both rounds at 100 yrds.

Is this elevation control really for a 55 grain round or does it even matter at all? Should I expect elevation control to have enough "play" in it that you aren't going to flip from 1 to 6 and hit both targets (if you were perfect shooter)

Is this elevation control something you just go out and test per weapon and you end up w/ something like " im shooting 600 yrd target, this weapon, this round, i set to 5.25 on dial" or should this be precise first time going the distance?

Trying to avoid allot rounds in the dirt trying to test how this works.
 

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nih said:
This incredible new system, based on a .223/5.56mm 55-grain polymer tipped bullet, simply and effectively allows you to dial in your elevation anywhere from 100 to 600 yards away in less than one revolution! Now you can stay in the middle of your Nikoplex crosshair at virtually any shooting distance with a quick turn of the turret
...the bullet drop compensation feature on you scope "compensates" for the effect of gravity...ie...bullet drop...and is "calibrated" for a "specific" type and caliber of bullet having a "specific" muzzle velosity...weight...ballistic coefficient etc...when fired under "predetermined" and "specific" enviromental conditions such as altitude and temperature...ie density altitude...

...in your case...your particular Nikon scope is calibrated for a 55 grain polymer tiped bullet in .223 caliber...and is based upon that particular bullet's trajectory based on a specific muzzle velosity and set enviromental variables that are determined by the manufacturer...any deviations from these pre determined paramaters will result in a change in the bullets trajectory and therefore a change in the bullets point of impact regarding elevation...

...the "bullet drop compensation" feature of your scope will function only with projectiles that have the same trajectories to which your BDC is calibrated...the deviation in the point of impact will usually become more apparent as the range increases when using projectiles with dissimilar trajectories...the key element here is to match the trajectory...or come close...for which the BDC is calibrated when using different projectiles and exit velosities...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks ullie, i've been reading more about scopes with these fast adjustments and i hope it works out.

i put it on sunday and fired 80 rounds at indoor 100 yrd range, glass is really nice.

this scope is abit different than what ive seen in my limited experience, they have all had caps you take off then use flathead to turn zero, no rapid turning stuff, either mil dots or guesstimation from zero.

the basic concept is you turn the elevation and windage knobs as you zero, once you zero you pop up the knob and it disengages the knob from the crosshairs, you line the numbers back up to zero an push it down.

i think this is really nice for new shooters, there is a 600 yrd range close by that i plan on visiting in the next month.

I should be able to use my zero w/ pmc 55gr fmj at 100 yrd then zero in at 200 300 etc by just turning the knobs, i record where my dial is set for new zeros at each distance. once i do that i should be able to just dial in any range from what i determine, can make a new sheet for each type of ammo i want to shoot, 55gr 69gr 75gr then i will know where to set my knobs for any distance with any round. will never have to pop the knob up again once i have it all recorded. all dialed in off my original 100 yrd 55gr zero, just have to watch people handling my gun that they dont mess around and adjust my knobs in the wrong way or..bu-bye zero, restart everything.

thats the plan, it will probably be harder for me not knowing if its my shooting or the zero but over time/rds i should be able to pinpoint exactly what to dial scope in at for each combintation, after zero i was putting 20 rds in 3-4" around center of target, bench rest, range was nice, had a video screen beside me that shows where rounds impact and records them until you clear it, wish it was longer than 100yrds.

i recommend this scope, the 2-8x seems to be plenty of magnification for a sig, i like the lower profile 32mm look and had a nice picture down range thru it at any magnification, had medium 1" surefire rings and they are to low even with stock end of scope hanging back over stock, the front touched, ended up putting surefire grandslam 1" rings on
 
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