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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello friends, a local dealer has a SIG 556 SWAT that i am seriously
considering. This would be my first rifle and i would like to know about
your recommendations on what gun oil to use on the inside for lubrication as well as what to use on the outside to mantain the finish.

Thank you for your answers, your friend in PR, Fito
 

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I am very curious as well. I still have not picked mine up yet (I will on Tuesday) All I have at the moment is CLP. I have been Reading some AR forums and read that some people actually use Motor Oil.
 

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Balistol

The folks at SIG swear by Balistol and use it exclusively for cleaning/lubricating the SIG handguns at SIG Sauer Academy. I assume they'd use it for their rifles as well (correct me if I'm wrong, anyone).
 

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I've tried alot of oils over the years on sermi and full automatics (TetraGun, CLP, etc.) and have found the 'molecular bond' type oils to be the best. Currently, I have found an oil from Brownells' , FRICTION DEFENSE, that is about the best oil I have ever used, bar none. Combines a synthetic base with moly, teflon and 'pressure additives' that seems to be the right combo for a semi-auto. Does not seem to attract dirt either. I am constantly amazed by this product (Brownell's part number 083-000-023)


Dave
 

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Rem Oil from Remington has had good reviews, and I use it for the more treasured firearms. Just a thought in addition to the other fine lubricants listed here.
 

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gcrookston said:
I use either Tetra gun grease or Slick 50 grease on the contact points (just a dab), and BreakFree CLP on the rest.
I too have gone from using many different oils over the years to using gun grease. Just a small amount at friction points works great for all guns.
 

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...i use Breakfree CLP and LP...it's an excellect lubricant and protects well against rust and corrosion...as do many of the excellent oils avaiable today such as Weapon Shield and Ezzox...

...grease should not be used in the actions of small arms...unless they are heavy, high cycling heat producers such as some of the SAWs... a M249 or RPK 74 for example...or one of the heavier general purpose machine guns...

...grease is a mixture of mineral or syntetic oils and a thickner...usually one of the metalic soaps such as lithium, calcium or sodium...holding the oils in a semi-liguid state...in order for the grease to provide lubrication the oils need to "bleed out"...this occures when the grease is subjected to an increase in temperature, pressure, shear forces and so on...by the innitial friction( resulting in higher temperatures) and loads placed on the areas in which the metal contacts...when the temperature, pressure and shear foces drop the oil is saoked up by the thickner (soap)...

...oils...such as Breakfree or Weapon Shield...are already in liquid form and avaiable to lubricate over a much wider temperature range form the onset than grease...which need to release their lubricating oils before they can begin to lubricate effectively...grease is just not as efficient as an oil since the lubricant is held captive in the "soap" until such conditions are met to release the oils...these conditions are seldon found in small arms...they simply do not generate the heat, pressure and load to consistently release the oil from the thickner...and form an effective boundry layer (film) to adequately reduce the co-efficient of friction between the moving parts as well as an oil.

...grease ...being thicker than oil induces it's own friction into the system..."friction by viscosity"...an opposition to flow readily...and generating "fluid resistance" (friction)...especially when cold...and compleately in a semi-fluid state...

...grease holds particulate matter such as unburned powder, the by products of combustion ( carbon and fouling and such) and external debris such as dust and sand in suspension introducing additional resistance (friction) to the system...and depending on the constituents of the origional source...possible abrasives...oil, on the other hand, allows most of this particulate matter to be pushed aside to some degree...whereas grease captures it...

...most grease is application specific and will only work well within narrow parameters of temperature and load...including grease marketed for weapons...small arms are better served with "lubricating oils" that are always avaiable to lubricate...since already in liquid form...and oils lubricate through a much wider range of temperatures and loads...
 

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I use MILITEC. It's a bit expensive, but it's good stuff and a 4 ounce bottle lasts a long time. First apply a bit heavy (don't soak it). Let your parts sit for a few hours so it can bond to the metal. I just leave mine overnight. Then wipe all parts well with a cloth, and reapply a very very very thin coat. Any dirt or carbon that accumulates wipes off very easily, and there is no need to reapply for a long time. This stuff is especially good in dusty environments.
 

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I think overall, CLP offers the best corrosion protection from my experience and what I've seen in comparison tests. For lubrication, I've found TetraGun to be very good. Ballistol is a good product, while it is stinky, from all I've heard it's entirely non-toxic and is about the least likely to adversely affect polymers or wood finishes. I've also had good luck with Corrosion-X spray. It does a good job of penetrating small orifices and doesn't attract foreign particulates. It's especially good for .22s.

Regarding Grease vs. oil, I normally take Bruce Gray's advice. Speaking of handguns in particular, he recommends using a good heavy grease like RIG+P or Slide Glide for practice and training. For carry he recommends using a good quality oil. The heavy grease affords the best protection (especially on frame rails and contact surfaces) to prevent premature wear. I don't know if he'd recommend the same for a long arm or not. So, for the 556, I just stick with Tetra oil. It's an oil that's only slightly thicker in viscosity than CLP. I still consider Breakfree CLP superior to Tetra oil for corrosion protection, so if I were in a humid environment, CLP would be the way to go.
 

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For those heavy duty cleanings after a long weekend at the range, I use M-Pro 7.

http://www.mp7.com/MPro7GunCleaner.aspx

For lubrication, general light cleaning, and corrosion protection, I use EEZOX.

http://www.eezox.com/gun-care.html

Both are great products for their intended purpose.

I did my initial cleaning on my new Sig 556 tonight after work. I love how easy this weapon field strips and goes back together. A real joy to work on and easy to clean.

m-forgery
 

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I use CorrosionX exclusively on all of my guns. Except for my Swiss guns which I use Automatenfett exclusively on.
 

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Oil??

I have been from Lubriplate, Rem-Oil, Tuf-oil, to Breakfree, to Tetra oil and grease, but have a question for the group. I have been advised to keep protective teflon-based products out of the chamber and barrel because of high temperatures. Any thoughts on these leaving a hard-to-remove residue if weapon is fired with lube in place since they are supposed to bond even when wiped dry???
 

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Re: Oil??

cbobclark said:
I have been from Lubriplate, Rem-Oil, Tuf-oil, to Breakfree, to Tetra oil and grease, but have a question for the group. I have been advised to keep protective teflon-based products out of the chamber and barrel because of high temperatures. Any thoughts on these leaving a hard-to-remove residue if weapon is fired with lube in place since they are supposed to bond even when wiped dry???
...with today's available lubrication technologies it's probably more difficult to find an "inaduquate" lubricant than a "good" one...


...you shouldn't leave lubricant in the barrel or chamber of your weapon...it can affect reliability and can also be dangerous if excessive...causing an excessive pressure buildup and /or tremendous increase in "bolt thrust"...just run a clean dry patch through the barrel and chamber before firing your weapon and you'll be just fine...irregardless of the lubricant you use...

...some of the better lubricants on the market are Breakfree CLP...Weapons Shield...Eezox...Slip 2000...Tetra Gun Oil...Firepower FP 10...TRI-FLOW (PTFE)..and there are many others...

...some of the lubricants i would avoid are Rem Oil...G96...Rig+P...Hoppies...Rusty Duck...Kleenbore Superlube...Koopers...Pro-Shot...and products such as 3 in 1 oil and WD 40...

...if you use a lot of lubricant and want to save some money...a mixture of ~2/3 diesel oil ( not diesel fuel ) to ~1/3 Dextron ATF works very well...
 

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...with today's available lubrication technologies it's probably more difficult to find an "inaduquate" lubricant than a "good" one
WD40 comes to mind.

[/quote]you shouldn't leave lubricant in the barrel or chamber of your weapon...it can affect reliability and can also be dangerous if excessive...causing an excessive pressure buildup and /or tremendous increase in "bolt thrust"...just run a clean dry patch through the barrel and chamber before firing your weapon and you'll be just fine...irregardless of the lubricant you use... [/quote]

Where do you get this information? It does not hurt to leave a thin layer of oil in the barrel. It is not smart to leave lube in the chamber. Although I have been doing it for years and have never had a problem. But I do agree with you on rest of the post.
 
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