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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,
I’m new to this forum but I’ve had my Sig 556 for quite a while now and I love it so much that I’ve been kicking around the idea of trying to develop an M-Lok handguard for mine.

Does anyone else have any interest in this sort of thing? I suspect a significant bit of weight could be removed from the front of an already front heavy rifle.

My rifle is a registered 10.5” SBR so if we did anything that’s what we would start with. I’m personally not looking to make any money on this but as previously stated, I love this rifle so much I don’t mind investing money into a part that would bring it into modern times.

In the machining world once the time is taken to develop a part, subsequent parts are as easy to make as pushing the cycle start button on a CNC machine.

I’ve personally never undertaken a venture like this so any input would be very appreciated.

Let me know what you guys think.
 

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Personally, I think ventures like this are always worthwhile. The Swiss (B&T?) make an M-Lok aluminum handguard for the P556 and Patrol length gas system. However, it is designed to interface with the 553/2 top rail as I recall. It is also kind of derpy looking IMO. I say go for it. I would be interested in a longer mid 551 length if you do develop both sizes and the cost is not up there with the B&T.
 

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It's crazy expensive, and kinda disappointing because its a sintered powder metal process, so think like a cast part.
Upload the stp file to xometry and they'll tell you how much different manufacturing processes cost. They're pretty expensive but it's worth it if you need a special material. I've had them make me FDM printed Ultem parts and SLS printed Nylon 11 parts.
FDM is the familiar 3d printing processs, where spools of plastic filament are extruded by a heated nozzle mounted on an XY gantry. It draws a 2d cross-section of the part in molten plastic, then moves up layer by layer until its done. SLS plastic 3d printing is more similar to metal 3d printing. The build area has powdered plastic spread over it and scraped flat. Then a laser draws the part shape of each layer, Selectively Laser Sintering the plastic power into solid parts.
The parts I had made were a Dana60 axle locking hub cam ring, and a prototype bolt carrier. I got the cam ring FDM printed in Ultem1010, an engineering plastic that's as string as some grades of aluminum. The bolt carrier was SLS printed from powdered PA11, so its completely solid and has even strength in all directions. FDM prints are weaker in the Z axis than the X/Y, because of the layered construction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I gotcha. I meet with my buddy today or tomorrow. I’ll come back when I’ve got any sort of update.
The 3d printed stuff, while cool, are a bit unrefined for my taste. I would prefer a finely machined piece of aluminum and a good type 3 anodizing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Due to scheduling conflict with our families, we could not get together as previously stated. We are shooting for this weekend to brainstorm. In the meantime, does anyone have any ideas for features that might be easy for an amateur like myself to include but would be a value-add?

I was thinking of finding a way to include a provision for a rotation limited QD sling cup. Something like a dedicated spot to place the adapter that wouldn’t take up M-lok space but also for an attachment that is prevalent and relatively inexpensive.

One more thing, does anyone have a line on a lower receiver that features a 553 style folding stock but takes STANAG magazines? I really want to put an ACR stock on my rifle.

Thanks!
 
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